Happy Family Night Market
An annual event that celebrates the Asian diaspora through food, art, and education.

Food

 
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The Food Festival is open from 12:00PM — 9:00PM on the Sidewalk & 12:00PM — 10:00PM in the Amphitheater & Garden

Inspired by the vibrant open air bazaars in Asia and the multicultural evolution of America, the food festival is a place where stories of migration, assimilation, and tradition are told through the lens of food. We aim to establish a sustainably-minded food festival by using compostable serving ware and diverting waste from landfills through our partnership with Roho Compost. Curated by Xinyi Lim.


 
Nasi lemak, kaya butter toast, pulut inti, and Malaysian white coffee. Photo courtesy of Kopitiam.

Nasi lemak, kaya butter toast, pulut inti, and Malaysian white coffee. Photo courtesy of Kopitiam.

Kopitiam

12:00PM — 10:00PM
Amphitheater

Chef Kyo Pang & Moonlynn Tsai

James Beard-nominated Kopitiam is named after coffee shops found in Penang, Malaysia — “kopi,” Malay for “coffee,” and “tiam,” Hokkien for “shop.” Kopitiam was founded in 2015 by Kyo Pang, in the hopes of keeping her family’s tradition of Nyonya cooking alive through her cafe. In 2018, she partnered with restaurateur Moonlynn Tsai to open its current location at 151 E Broadway in Chinatown. @kopitiamnyc

 

 
Chicken Fesenjan, sabzi pulao, mirza ghasemi, and baklava. Photo courtesy of Eat Offbeat.

Chicken Fesenjan, sabzi pulao, mirza ghasemi, and baklava. Photo courtesy of Eat Offbeat.

Eat Offbeat

12:00PM — 9:00PM
Sidewalk

Chefs Nasrin, Bashir, Diaa, Shanthini, and Dhuha

Eat Offbeat is a Queens-based delivery service that offers dishes from resettled refugees focused on making traditional, homestyle fare from their native countries including Iraq, Syrian Arab Republic, Eritrea, Sri Lanka, Guinea, Islamic Republic of Iran, Afghanistan and Senegal. Founded by siblings Wissam and Manal Kahi, the social enterprise is partnered with the International Rescue Committee (IRC), which helps thousands of refugees recover and reclaim control of their future each year.
@eatoffbeat

 

 
Fuchka, jhal muri, ma’s special, and shorbot. Photo courtesy of Jhal.

Fuchka, jhal muri, ma’s special, and shorbot. Photo courtesy of Jhal.

Jhal

12:00PM — 10:00PM
Amphitheater

Mahfuzul Islam & Alvi Zaman

Founded by Mahfuzul Islam and Alvi Zaman, Jhal NYC is a social entrepreneurship venture built to empower the Bengali diaspora. It employs stay at home mothers and new immigrants and prepares them for paths they seek to transition to, thus creating a community for these marginalized groups. @jhalnyc

 

 
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Burrow

12:00PM — 10:00PM
Marketplace

Patissier Ayako Kurokawa

Burrow was founded 8 years ago as a custom-made pastry studio, which has since transformed into a tiny take out bakery in DUMBO. Burrow strives to create the finest pastries with butter, sugar, and beautiful graphic design. 


 

 
Jilbert stretching booza. Photo courtesy of Republic of Booza.

Jilbert stretching booza. Photo courtesy of Republic of Booza.

Republic of Booza

12:00PM — 10:00PM
Garden

Jilbert El-Zmetr, Michael Sadler, Jeff Lan

Founded by Jilbert El-Zmetr and Michael Sadler, Republic of Booza is rediscovering the roots of ice cream with the first booza scoop-shop in the US. The frozen dessert dates back to the development of freezing dairy, which took place 500 years ago in the Levant region of the Eastern Mediterranean. Its soft elasticity results from the combination of sahlab (ground orchid root) and mastic (a resin) with milk, cream, and sugar which is then pounded with a pestle and stretched by hand. Republic of Booza will be collaborating with HFNM to create unique flavors with a focus on Central, South and Western Asian cuisines for the food festival. @republicofbooza

 

Steamed bao, chicken feet, har gow, and shrimp stuffed eggplant. Photo courtesy of Nom Wah Nolita.

Steamed bao, chicken feet, har gow, and shrimp stuffed eggplant. Photo courtesy of Nom Wah Nolita.

Nom Wah Nolita

12:00PM — 9:00PM
Sidewalk

Chef Julie Cole

Nom Wah Tea Parlor first opened as a bakery at 13–15 Doyers Street in 1920, and has seen an evolution ever since. Long-time owner Wally Tang passed the business onto his nephew, Wilson Tang, in 2011. The restaurant has since become a way for Wilson to bridge the gap between his family heritage and a new generation of diners, including at his fast-casual outpost in Nolita. @nomwahnolita

 

Nua toon, som tum, and kao thod nhaem klook. Photo by Jeenah Moon for The New York Times

Nua toon, som tum, and kao thod nhaem klook. Photo by Jeenah Moon for The New York Times

Thai Farm Kitchen

12:00PM — 9:00PM
Sidewalk

Chef Elizabeth Kanyawee Calvo & Jess Calvo

Jess Calvo and Elizabeth Kanyawee Calvo ran a hydroponic farm and three award-winning restaurants in Nonthaburi Province, Thailand before selling everything they had to open their restaurant in Kensington, Brooklyn. At Thai Farm Kitchen, Chef Calvo cooks her grandma’s recipes using organic ingredients sourced from Hudson Valley farms. @thaifarmkitchen

 

 
Vegan cassava cake. Photo courtesy of OPOPO x San & Wolves.

Vegan cassava cake. Photo courtesy of OPOPO x San & Wolves.

OPOPO x San & Wolves Bakeshop

12:00PM — 10:00PM
Amphitheater

Chefs Jessica Joan Causing & Kym Estrada

Opo x San is a collaboration between Kym Estrada (San & Wolves Bakeshop) and Jessica Joan Causing (OPOPO), who both explore their backgrounds as Filipinx-Americans through plant-based foods. As advocates of a vegan lifestyle, their mission is to deliver a new experience on nostalgic dishes from their childhood.